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general/Evidence

Social media evidence: admissibility issuesx

Dec. 23, 2016

Proponents seeking to admit social media evidence will face three primary hurdles of admissibility: relevance, authentication and hearsay. By Mark Jackson

general/Constitutional Law

Right to privacy and civil discovery

Dec. 19, 2016

Learn about the source of the right to privacy, the test for determining when discovery may be curtailed due to the right, and specific areas covered by the right. By Patricia M. Lucas and Gary Nadler


general/Litigation

Tips for using social media research during voir dire

Dec. 16, 2016

Lawyers looking to research the social media habits of prospective or empaneled jurors should take to heart the childhood adage: "Look, don't touch." By Michelle Sherman

general/Law Practice Management

More contract attorney complications

Dec. 2, 2016

Law firms should carefully consider whether their policies and procedures are sufficient to allow the firm to reap the benefits of contract attorneys while limiting the associated risks.


general/Expert Testimony

Be an expert on experts

Nov. 25, 2016

Expert evidence can come up in any case, from trade secret, to product liability, to breach of contract. It is important to minimize the risk of exclusion for your expert and identify any flaws in the opponent's evidence. By John Thornburgh, Olga May and Alex Gelberg

general/Criminal Practice

Pro per defendants' requests in criminal cases

Nov. 21, 2016

Learn about pro per defendants' requests for ancillary services. By Jacqueline A. Connor


general/Law Practice Management

Contract attorney complications

Nov. 11, 2016

It is becoming more common for law firms to use contract attorneys to assist with large projects or document reviews to help keep costs down.

general/Law Practice Management

Ensure that your clients pay your fees

Nov. 4, 2016

After spending countless hours, months and even years working on a case, the last thing you want to worry about is not getting paid. By Lorraine M. Walsh


general/Criminal Law

Penal Code Section 17 reductions

Oct. 28, 2016

The objective of this article and accompanying self-study test is to familiarize bench officers and lawyers with reduction of felonies to misdemeanors, and misdemeanors to infractions, under Penal Code Section 17. By Hank Goldberg

general/Competence Issues (Addressing Substance Abuse and Physical/Mental Impairment)

Alternative Discipline Program can help attorney addicts

Oct. 7, 2016

Recognizing the alarming rate of substance abuse among lawyers, the State Bar offers the Alternative Discipline Program — a chance to both obtain treatment for substance abuse and mental health issues, and save their law license. By Heather E. Abelson